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Original Research

Open Access Special Issue

Analysis of cardiopulmonary function, energy metabolism, and exercise intensity and time according to the number of repetitions of Taekwondo Taegeuk Poomsae in Taekwondo players

  • Won-Sang Jung1,†
  • Hwang-Woon Moon2,†
  • Jeong-Weon Kim3
  • Hun-Young Park1,4
  • Jong-Beom Park5
  • Sang-Hwan Choi5
  • Jae-Don Lee5
  • Sang-Seok Nam5

1Physical Activity and Performance Institute, Konkuk University, 05029 Seoul, Republic of Korea

2Department of Sports Outdoors, Eulji University, 13135 Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea

3Graduate School of Professional Therapy, Gachon University, 13120 Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea

4Department of Sports Medicine and Science, Konkuk University, 05029 Seoul, Republic of Korea

5Taekwondo Research Institute, Kukkiwon, 06130 Seoul, Republic of Korea

DOI: 10.31083/jomh.2021.140

Submitted: 26 August 2021 Accepted: 08 October 2021

Online publish date: 27 October 2021

*Corresponding Author(s): Sang-Seok Nam E-mail: playdata.n@gmail.com

† These authors contributed equally.

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Abstract

Background: This study aimed to compare and analysis of cardiopulmonary function, energy metabolism, and exercise intensity and time according to the number of repetitions of Taekwondo Taegeuk Poomsae in Taekwondo players.

Methods: The participants were 29 healthy men (19.5 ± 1.2) who could perform Taekwondo Taeguek Poomsae 1 to 8 Jang.

Results: Minute ventilation, oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide excretion, which assess cardiopulmonary function, were highest in 1st repetition of Taegeuk 6–8 Jang and 5th and 10th repetitions of Taegeuk 4 and 5 Jang, respectively. The respiratory exchange ratio was highest in 1st repetition of Taegeuk 1 Jang and 5th and 10th repetitions of Taegeuk 8 Jang. Regardless of the number of repetitions, carbohydrate oxidation was highest in Taegeuk 8 Jang, and energy consumption was highest in Taegeuk 5–8 Jang. The amount of fat oxidation was higher in 1st repetition of other Taegeuk Poomsaes than in 1st repetition of Taegeuk 1 and 2, and a similar occurrence was observed with 5th repetitions. However, at the 10th repetition, Taegeuk 8 Jang was the lowest. Regarding exercise intensity and time, the percentage heart rate maximum exercise intensity for 1st repetition of the Poomsaes was 54%–63%, for 5th repetitions was 69%–82%, and for 10th repetitions was 72%–87%. The time duration according to the number of repetitions was 0.31 to 0.66 minutes for 1st repetition, 2.05 to 3.79 minutes for 5th repetitions, and 4.22 to 7.70 minutes for 10th repetitions.

Conclusions: This study suggests that as the number of repetitions of Taekwondo Taegeuk Poomsae increased, the cardiopulmonary function, exercise intensity, and energy metabolism increased. In particular, cardiopulmonary function and exercise intensity were similar for all but Taegeuk Poomsae 1 Jang, but the energy consumption was higher in Taegeuk 5–8 Jang than in Taegeuk 1–4 Jang.

Keywords

Taekwondo; Taegeuk Poomsae; Number of repetitions; Cardiopulmonary function; Exercise intensity; Energy metabolism

Cite and Share

Won-Sang Jung,Hwang-Woon Moon,Jeong-Weon Kim,Hun-Young Park,Jong-Beom Park,Sang-Hwan Choi,Jae-Don Lee,Sang-Seok Nam. Analysis of cardiopulmonary function, energy metabolism, and exercise intensity and time according to the number of repetitions of Taekwondo Taegeuk Poomsae in Taekwondo players. Journal of Men's Health. 2021.doi:10.31083/jomh.2021.140.

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