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Case Report

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Robot-assisted laparoscopic intracorporeal urachal mass resection and partial cystectomy for a huge urachal adenocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature

  • Jae Joon Park1
  • Woong Bin Kim2
  • Kwang Woo Lee2
  • Jun Mo Kim2
  • Young Ho Kim2
  • Jae Heon Kim1
  • Ahrim Moon3
  • Si Hyun Kim4
  • Sang Wook Lee2

1Department of Urology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, 04401 Seoul, Korea

2Department of Urology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, 14584 Bucheon, Korea

3Department of Pathology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, 14584 Bucheon, Korea

4Department of Urology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, 31151 Cheonan, Korea

DOI: 10.31083/jomh.2021.037 Vol.17,Issue 3,July 2021 pp.174-180

Submitted: 12 February 2021 Accepted: 09 March 2021

Published: 08 July 2021

*Corresponding Author(s): Sang Wook Lee E-mail: bartol@schmc.ac.kr

PDF (3.13 MB)

Abstract

Urachal adenocarcinoma is rare, accounting for only 10% of adenocarcinomas of the bladder and the prognosis of urachal adenocarcinomas is poor since most cases are detected late. Since urachal adenocarcinoma is a rare disease, no effective standard treatment has yet been established. However, in recent studies, resection of carcinoma is considered the only treatment considered for non-metastatic cases. Although for large sized urachal adenocarcinoma, open surgery or laparoscopic surgery is usually considered, we have recently experienced huge urachal carcinoma by robotic surgery. We used cystoscopy and the robot to assess the cancer margins and safely perform the operation. A 71-year-old man with a medical history of hypertension and arrhythmia visited our urology department with urachal cancer detected by computed tomography (CT). CT showed a lobulated low-density mass, most likely urachal carcinoma, abutting the anterior dome of the bladder and anterior abdominal wall. We performed preoperative cystoscopy to assess the extent of the protrusion of the urachal cancer into the bladder wall and the area requiring resection during surgery. We confirmed the size and extent of the mass protruding into the anterior wall of the urinary bladder and Robot-assisted laparoscopic intracorporeal urachal mass resection and partial cystectomy using cystoscopy together was performed. After one month, the patient has no complications and no complaining symptoms complaints without any abnormal finding of follow up imaging test. Although more procedures must be performed to ensure the safety of robotic surgery as a treatment strategy for large urachal carcinomas, we confirm that robotic surgery can replace open or laparoscopic surgery for such tumors.

Keywords

Robot surgical procedure; Urachal adenocarcinoma; Minimal invasive surgical procedures; Case report

Cite and Share

Jae Joon Park,Woong Bin Kim,Kwang Woo Lee,Jun Mo Kim,Young Ho Kim,Jae Heon Kim,Ahrim Moon,Si Hyun Kim,Sang Wook Lee. Robot-assisted laparoscopic intracorporeal urachal mass resection and partial cystectomy for a huge urachal adenocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature. Journal of Men's Health. 2021. 17(3);174-180.

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