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Original Research

Open Access

Dominant and non-dominant arm bone mineral density of racquet athletes

  • Şaban Ünver1
  • Tülin Atan1
  • Fevziye Canbaz Tosun2
  • İzzet İslamoğlu1
  • Abdurrahim Kaplan3

1University of Ondokuz Mayıs, Faculty of Sports Science, Samsun, Turkey

2University of Ondokuz Mayıs, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun, Turkey

3University of Hitit, Faculty of Sports Science, Corum, Turkey

DOI: 10.31083/jomh.2021.003 Vol.17,Issue 2,April 2021 pp.142-147

Published: 08 April 2021

*Corresponding Author(s): Şaban Ünver E-mail: saban.unver@omu.edu.tr

PDF (139 kB)

Abstract

Background and Purpose: The upper extremities, especially the arms and shoulders, are used intensively in racquet sports. In this work, our primary aim is to compare bone mineral densities (BMDs) between dominant and non-dominant arms in racquet athletes. We then compare BMDs between athletes playing racquet sports and non-athletes.

Methods: A total of 24 racquet sports male athletes active for at least 10 years (age, 22.46 ± 2.41 years) and 22 non-athletes (age, 21.45 ± 1.74 years) voluntarily participated in this study. The BMDs of the humerus, radius, and ulna of the dominant and non-dominant arms of both groups were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Results: The BMDs of the proximal humerus and humeral shaft of dominant arms were significantly higher than those of non-dominant arms in athletes (19.85% vs. 12.02%); while statistically, no statistically significant difference in BMDs was found in non-athletes (P > 0.05). The BMDs of the dominant proximal humerus and humeral shaft of athletes were higher than those of non-athletes (P < 0.05). Non-dominant arm BMDs did not differ between the two groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusion: BMD differences observed between the right and left arms of athletes indicate that, rather than confounding factors like genotype, right-/left-handedness, participation in racquet sports may influence BMDs in the related extremities.

Keywords

Athletes; Bone mineral density; DEXA; Dominance

Cite and Share

Şaban Ünver,Tülin Atan,Fevziye Canbaz Tosun,İzzet İslamoğlu,Abdurrahim Kaplan. Dominant and non-dominant arm bone mineral density of racquet athletes. Journal of Men's Health. 2021. 17(2);142-147.

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