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CHALLENGES AND BARRIERS EXPERIENCED BY PRINCE GEORGE PARENTS IN PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHILDREN TO ENGAGE IN HEALTHY EATING AND ACTIVE LIVING: A MEN’S HEALTH PARENTS PERSPECTIVE

  • Mamdouh M. Shubair1
  • Jenna Scott1

1Assistant Professor (Tenured), School of Health Sciences, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, Canada

DOI: 10.22374/1875-6859.13.1.6 Vol.13,Issue 1,May 2017 pp.45-53

Published: 25 May 2017

*Corresponding Author(s): Mamdouh M. Shubair E-mail: mamdouh.shubair@unbc.ca

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Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate the challenges and successes experienced by parents in provid-ing children with opportunities for healthy living. Focus group interviews were conducted with parents of children 0-6 years to discuss challenges and successes in healthy eating, active living and being screen smart. The focus group interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. Three main themes emerged from transcripts which include: Barriers to Healthy Living; Parent Involvement; and Child Involvement. It is recommended that the Healthy Families Prince George committee design community initiatives to support families in the Prince George area to achieve optimal healthy living, based on the study results. Upstream social policies are warranted in order to support low socio-economic status (SES) male parents and their families to achieve healthy lifestyle including healthy eating and active living.

Keywords

focus groups; healthy living; parental role modeling; child involvement; public health policy; food security; men’s health

Cite and Share

Mamdouh M. Shubair,Jenna Scott. CHALLENGES AND BARRIERS EXPERIENCED BY PRINCE GEORGE PARENTS IN PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHILDREN TO ENGAGE IN HEALTHY EATING AND ACTIVE LIVING: A MEN’S HEALTH PARENTS PERSPECTIVE. Journal of Men's Health. 2017. 13(1);45-53.

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