The Effects of Self-Construal and the Living Environment on Internalized Homophobia among Chinese Gay Men

Main Article Content

Zhengjia Ren
Ralph Hood
Chunsong Yang
Chunsong Yang
Xiqi Lu
Qiuyu Su
Tsingan Li

Keywords

Keywords: Self-construal, Homophobia, Cross-Cultural, Homosexuality

Abstract

Background and Objective
Internalized homophobia is common among gay men. Gay men who live in high-tolerance social envi-ronments tend to have less internalized homophobia than gay men who live in low-tolerance environ-ments. The interaction between the living environment and self-construal influences gay men’s internalized homophobia.


Material and Methods
This study examined the association between self-construal and homophobia according to the living environment using a sample of gay men (N=521) aged 14–43 years. The data were collected between January and August 2017 using an online questionnaire that included an internalized homophobia scale, self-construal items, and demographic characteristics. The two-way ANOVA analyses revealed that the self-construal type was differentially associated with internalized homophobia depending on the living environment of the study participants.


Results
Living in a high-tolerance area while having an independent self-construal was associated with lower internalized homophobia scores than living in a low-tolerance area. In contrast, alternating between independent and dependent self-construals was associated with higher internalized homophobia scores.


Conclusion
Mental health services for participants with conflicted self-construals are emerging. Self-acceptance and compassion-focused practices should be explored as a way to help gay men adjust their conflicted self-construals.


 


 


 

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